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Monthly Archives: August 2017

Remove Carbon Fiber Decals From Vehicles

Much like the application process, it is best to start with heat. Most professionals will use a heat gun, but a hair dryer will suffice if need be. You need to work in sections when heating the decal, it’s pointless to heat the whole space up as you won’t be able to work fast enough to remove the entire thing before it cools down. Heating up the decal helps to soften the adhesive making it easier to remove. However, be sure not to overheat as it can make the adhesive too sticky, making more work for you in the long run.

Once you have heated up the decal, start in a corner spot and gently begin peeling back the decal. You can typically do this with your finger nails, but you can also use a plastic scrapper or old credit card if need be. DO NOT use metal; this will damage the paint job underneath. Smaller decals may come off in one peel, but for larger spaces, you will need to work at it, and it may rip off in spots.

When peeling, be sure to work at about a 120 degree angle, meaning pull the material backwards towards the remaining decal. Keeping the material at a low angle will reduce the amount of tension on the vinyl, making it less likely to tear in the process.

Once the decal is removed, you may notice there is some sticky residue left over. Many stores offer products that are specifically made to remove this residue, but be sure not to use harsh chemicals as this can cause damage to the surface. After removing the sticky residue, wipe the area with a mild soap and water to remove any remaining residue and be sure to let the surface dry completely before installing another decal.

Car Audio Installation Options

Materials Needed

Some of the materials you need to install a stereo include a socket wrench, a screwdriver, voltage meter, a solder or crimper, and a small battery. You may need some wire ties and electrical tape to keep the wires of the system tied in one place.

Removing the Original Radio or Stereo

You need to remove your old radio before you can install the new one. This is where the screwdriver comes in handy. Start by removing the screws that hold the front panel of the system. Be sure to keep the screws in one easy-to-reach place where you cannot lose them. Take the front panel of the system out. Inside the CD player housing, you will find another panel that you need to gently pull out until it unsnaps. Unscrew all the screws and bolts holding in the system. Pull out the CD player and unplug the cable that connects it to the automobile.

Wiring the New Radio

Take the cable of the new stereo and plug it into the car. Put the stereo where it needs to be and screw it into place. Make sure the screws are screwed in tight. Do the same for the front panel.

Hiring Someone Else

Many automotive companies provide radio installation services. In addition, electronic stores can install entertainment systems purchased from their stores. A car entertainment system installation is quite simple and there are slim chances that you will encounter any problems when you hire a professional to do the installation.

Car Audio Tips

Many modern vehicle CD players come with a wide range of features and are relatively sensitive pieces of equipment. It is important to take caution when operating your car CD player in different temperatures. If the motorcar has been exposed to the sun for a prolonged period and its interior temperature has increased, consider waiting until the automobile has cooled down before turning on the vehicle entertainment system. The same rule applies during winter; let the vehicle warm up a bit before turning on its entertainment player to reduce the risk of a malfunction.

Keep Tyres Looking Good

Did you know that there is a practical way to get your tyres to be glossy? This is known as dressing or protectant. Many car dealers will apply this substance on the tyres to give the car a glossier and more attractive appearance. It also protects the rubber from the UV lights of the sun and the toxic air pollution that degrades the quality rubber surface. The dressing or protectant also adds a layer to prevent any oil or dirt from sticking onto your tyre. This chemical isn’t greasy so it won’t cause you to spin on the road. Rather it is more of a non-stick surface that can grip onto the gravel or tar road.

Sunlight has the harsh ability to age and damage the rubber on the tyres. Over time you will start experiencing the tyres to be brittle and it can break with the slightest hit. However, you can avoid this from happening.

When cleaning your tyres you need to use a cloth, a high pressure hose and the cleaning detergent of your choice. You always start with hosing down the tyres to remove any dirt, oil or residue. This shouldn’t take long and will make the cleaning process easier. After you have hosed the dirt away you can apply the wheel detergent. To remove oil from the wheels you will require than just water so a wheel detergent would be ideal. Next, you can use brushes that can clean the treads and crevices. The cloth will absorb any water that was on the rim and leave it looking clean and sparkly.

About Car Waxing And Car Polishing

Compare polishing and waxing to a family portrait. Everyone wants to capture a beautiful moment and protect it with a nice frame. You may have an expensive, solid gold picture frame, but it can’t change a bad picture where your aunt and cousin’s eyes are closed.

Likewise, if a driver is seeking the best paint job possible then polishing may have to be done before waxing. Many paint jobs have deep defects that wax merely hides. As mentioned before, even a brand new car will need paint correction after just one bad wash. The swirls, scratches and air contamination that lay on an untreated car make waxing a stopgap solution at best. A contaminated paint job won’t gloss, and once the wax compound wears off, the defects will still be there. To properly eliminate those paint job defects, claying and/or polishing with an abrasive is necessary.

What’s An Abrasive?

An abrasive is any compound or instrument that has the ability to “cut” into your vehicle’s paint job and level out the defects. When a vehicle is fresh from the manufacturer, there is (hopefully) one top coat of paint evenly distributed along it. Over time, scratches, swirls and other scrapes tear into that top coat, leaving noticeable dips in the surface.

In order to re-align the paint job, paint correction must be done with abrasives such as car polish, clay bars, or even sandpaper. The average full paint correction consists of:

• Clay Barring, which removes surface contamination
• Wet Sanding or Color Sanding, which refines and smooths the paint job, priming it for
• Polishing, which eliminates swirls, scratches and other marring.

When polishing, detailers create a combination of friction and heat with their buffers, and eat away at all defects. Depending on how level (or not) the paint job is, a variety of buffers and compounds may be used to polish a vehicle’s surface. Paint correction is generally measured in three levels:

• 1-Step Paint Correction (Up to 75% of defects) – A less aggressive cut that removes most scratches on vehicles
• 2-Step Paint Correction (Up to 90% of defects removed) An aggressive approach which leaves only the deepest swirls apparent.
• 3-Step Paint Correction (90%+ of defects removed) A tedious, aggressive polish typically

Once proper correction has been done and any potential micro-marring (residual marks from aggressive polishing) has been removed, the wax process begins.

All About Car Wax

Car wax doesn’t have the restorative properties of polishing compounds, but it’s still of vital importance to your vehicle. A pure wax or “glaze” will protect your car’s paint job from the elements. Not only does wax provide a layer of security, it provides a beautiful gloss that will help your car shine like it did when you bought it.

Most auto industry waxes are made with Carnauba wax, which comes from Carnauba trees.